Media Release | Feb. 14, 2013

Bilingual babies know their grammar by seven months

Babies as young as seven months can distinguish between, and begin to learn, two languages with vastly different grammatical structures, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and Université Paris Descartes.

Published today in the journal Nature Communications and presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston, the study shows that infants in bilingual environments use pitch and duration cues to discriminate between languages – such as English and Japanese – with opposite word orders.

In English, a function word comes before a content word (the dog, his hat, with friends, for example) and the duration of the content word is longer, while in Japanese or Hindi, the order is reversed, and the pitch of the content word higher.

“By as early as seven months, babies are sensitive to these differences and use these as cues to tell the languages apart,” says UBC psychologist Janet Werker, co-author of the study.

Previous research by Werker and Judit Gervain, a linguist at the Université Paris Descartes and co-author of the new study, showed that babies use frequency of words in speech to discern their significance.

“For example, in English the words ‘the’ and ‘with’ come up a lot more frequently than other words – they’re essentially learning by counting,” says Gervain. “But babies growing up bilingual need more than that, so they develop new strategies that monolingual babies don’t necessarily need to use.”

“If you speak two languages at home, don’t be afraid, it’s not a zero-sum game,” says Werker. “Your baby is very equipped to keep these languages separate and they do so in remarkable ways.”

NB: Prof. Werker is available for interviews from Boston, MA. at 604-313-2697 from noon EST onwards on Feb. 14.

For more UBC news from AAAS 2013, visit aaas.ubc.ca or follow @ubcnews. 

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Prof. Janet Werker
UBC Dept. of Psychology
Cell: 604.313.2697
E-mail: jwerker@psych.ubc.ca

Prof. Judit Gerain
Universite Paris Descartes
E-mail: judit.gervain@parisdescartes.fr

Brian Lin
UBC Public Affairs
Cell: 604.818.5685
E-mail: brian.lin@ubc.ca

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Baby Leif (centre, pictured with parents Harumi Inokoshi and Eric Roe) is growing up bilingual, hearing Japanese from his mother and English from his father. The UBC study shows that even though languages like Japanese and English have opposite word orders ('from Vancouver' in English and 'Tokyo kara' in Japanese), bilingual babies can use the duration and pitch cues in speech to acquire the word order of each of their native languages. (Photo: Janet Werker, UBC Infant Studies Centre)

Baby Leif (centre, pictured with parents Harumi Inokoshi and Eric Roe) is growing up bilingual, hearing Japanese from his mother and English from his father. The UBC study shows that even though languages like Japanese and English have opposite word orders ('from Vancouver' in English and 'Tokyo kara' in Japanese), bilingual babies can use the duration and pitch cues in speech to acquire the word order of each of their native languages. (Photo: Janet Werker, UBC Infant Studies Centre)

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