Posts Tagged ‘conservation’

A UBC study shows shark tourism currently generates more than US$314M annually and is expected to more than double in the next 20 years. (Photo: Shawn Heinrichs)

Sharks worth more in the ocean than on the menu

May. 30, 2013 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed, Science, Health and Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sharks are worth more in the ocean than in a bowl of soup, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia.

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Monica Pearson wades into the chilly waters of the Fraser River to save Canada’s last 300 Oregon spotted frog breeding females

Against all odds

Apr. 3, 2013 | Filed under: Science, Health and Technology, UBC Reports Stories | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Monica Pearson wades into the chilly waters of the Fraser River to save Canada’s last 300 Oregon spotted frog breeding females

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Trisha Atwood at a stream site in UBC Malcolm Knapp Research Forest. Photo by: Amanda Klemmer

As predators decline, carbon emissions rise

Feb. 17, 2013 | Filed under: Media Release, Science, Health and Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

University of British Columbia researchers have found that when the animals at the top of the food chain are removed, freshwater ecosystems emit a lot more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

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The common dolphin (shown here) and the striped dolphin are similar in size but have very different diets. One eats energy rich prey and the other energy poor species. Photo credit: CRMM/University of La Rochelle

Eating right key to survival of whales and dolphins: UBC research

Nov. 21, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

In the marine world, high-energy prey make for high-energy predators. And to survive, such marine predators need to sustain the right kind of high-energy diet. Not just any prey will do, suggests a new study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of La Rochelle, in France.

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Fins labeled primary are most commonly harvested, while fins labeled secondary are only sometimes harvested; the three common fin cuts leave varying levels of meat attached to the fin. Credit: Biery, L. and Pauly, D. (2012) A global review of species-specific shark fin to body weight ratios and relevant legislation. Journal of Fish Biology. DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.03215.x

Law that regulates shark fishery is too liberal: UBC study

Mar. 2, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Shark fins are worth more than other parts of the shark and are often removed from the body, which gets thrown back into the sea. To curtail this wasteful practice, many countries allow the fins to be landed detached from shark bodies, as long as their weight does not exceed five per cent of the total shark catch. New University of British Columbia research shows that this kind of legislation is too liberal.

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More than 50-per-cent decline in elephants in eastern Congo due to human conflict: UBC research

Nov. 10, 2011 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , ,

Humans play a far greater role in the fate of African elephants than habitat loss, and human conflict in particular has a devastating impact on these largest terrestrial animals, according to a new University of British Columbia study published online in PLoS ONE this week.

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Arctic fisheries catches 75 times higher than previous reports: UBC research

Feb. 4, 2011 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , , ,

University of British Columbia researchers estimate that fisheries catches in the Arctic totaled 950,000 tonnes from 1950 to 2006, almost 75 times the amount reported to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) during this period.

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Alternative animal feed part of global fisheries crisis fix: UBC study

Nov. 17, 2009 | Filed under: Media Release | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Finding alternative feed sources for chickens, pigs and other farm animals will significantly reduce pressure on the world’s dwindling fisheries while contributing positively to climate change, according to University of British Columbia researchers.

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