Posts Tagged ‘evolution’

The common dolphin (shown here) and the striped dolphin are similar in size but have very different diets. One eats energy rich prey and the other energy poor species. Photo credit: CRMM/University of La Rochelle

Eating right key to survival of whales and dolphins: UBC research

Nov. 21, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

In the marine world, high-energy prey make for high-energy predators. And to survive, such marine predators need to sustain the right kind of high-energy diet. Not just any prey will do, suggests a new study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of La Rochelle, in France.

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Swainson's thrush in the wild. Photo credit: Darren Irwin, University of British Columbia.

Backpack-toting birds help UBC researchers reveal migratory divide, conservation hotspots

Sep. 25, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , , , ,

By outfitting two British Columbia subspecies of Swainson’s thrushes with penny-sized, state-of-the-art geolocators, University of British Columbia researchers have been able to map their wildly divergent migration routes and pinpoint conservation hotspots.

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Single-cell parasites co-opt “ready-made” genes from host: UBC research

Jul. 18, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , ,

Two species of single-cell parasites have co-opted “ready-made” genes from their hosts that in turn help them exploit their hosts, according to a new study by University of British Columbia and University of Ottawa researchers.

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Picky females promote diversity: UBC-IIASA study

Apr. 1, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Picky females play a critical role in the survival and diversity of species, according to a Nature study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria.

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Monogamy reduces major social problems of polygamist cultures

Jan. 23, 2012 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed, News Tip | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

In cultures that permit men to take multiple wives, the intra-sexual competition that occurs causes greater levels of crime, violence, poverty and gender inequality than in societies that institutionalize and practice monogamous marriage.

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Happy guys finish last, says new study on sexual attractiveness

May. 24, 2011 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women find happy guys significantly less sexually attractive than swaggering or brooding men, according to a new University of British Columbia study that helps to explain the enduring allure of “bad boys” and other iconic gender types.

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Death anxiety prompts people to believe in intelligent design, reject evolution: UBC research

Mar. 30, 2011 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , ,

Researchers at the University of British Columbia and Union College (Schenectady, N.Y.) have found that people’s death anxiety can influence them to support theories of intelligent design and reject evolutionary theory.

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“David and Goliath” viruses shed light on the origin of jumping genes: UBC study

Mar. 3, 2011 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , ,

University of British Columbia researchers have identified a small virus that attacks another virus more than 100 times its own size, rescuing the infected zooplankton from certain death. The discovery provides clues to the evolutionary origin of some jumping genes found in other organisms.

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Tiny fish evolved to tolerate colder temperature in three years: UBC study

Aug. 4, 2010 | Filed under: Media Release, News Feed | Tags: , , , , ,

University of British Columbia researchers have observed one of the fastest evolutionary responses ever recorded in wild populations. In as little as three years, stickleback fish developed tolerance for water temperature 2.5 degrees Celsius lower than their ancestors.

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Tropical birds waited for land crossing between North and South America: UBC study

Dec. 9, 2009 | Filed under: Media Release | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Despite their ability to fly, tropical birds waited until the formation of the land bridge between North and South America to move northward, according to a University of British Columbia study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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